Natasha Hazell

2020

“Photography shifted the way I navigate the world by showing me that I am able to slow down the world around me, notice stills in the chaos of life and enjoy that intimate experience whether I have my camera with me or not.” – Natasha Hazell.

View their photographs produced during this year, along with their year-end interview below:

PHOTOGRAPHER'S INSTAGRAM

YEAR-END INTERVIEW

When you started the programme what genre of photography were you interested in and has it shifted over the course of the year?

When I started the course, I was set on being a portrait and/or fashion photographer which hasn’t shifted greatly, but I’ve realised how much I love the creative side of photography where I can tell a story through visual metaphors, etc.

Analogue (film) or Digital photography and why?

I have a huge love and appreciation for analog photography and wish I could use it more, but I love to use digital photography as it is less expensive and restricting.

What subject matter do you find yourself drawn to?

People as well as capturing a moment or feeling in time.

Pick three words/phrases that describe your approach to the medium?

Emotive storyteller. Authentic. Creative.

Why did you choose to study photography?

I have always loved art and photography. I have been taking photographs of the people and world around me – capturing moments – for as long as I can remember and so I wanted to learn more and still do.

What has been the most noteworthy shoot/project you have done this year?

The most noteworthy shoot would have to be my personal project. It is extremely personal, yet universally recognised and relevant. It is raw and visceral and I have a great attachment to the work. I often struggle to use something as simple as the English language to explain the way I feel, see and experience and this work really helped me speak volumes. The use of the visual metaphors gives way to a sense of timelessness I never expected, as the narrative is open to change with each new perspective that comes with the role as the viewer.

What has been your biggest misconception about photography as a practice?

The amount of time that goes into each work created.

What is the most valuable thing you have learned from the course?

The fact that I am honestly my own worst critic and am more capable than I give myself credit for, and in realising that for myself I am able to continue to work at quieting that voice allowing me to reach my full potential. This is something I am truly grateful for.

How has photography shifted the way that you navigate the world?

I am able to slow down the world around me, notice stills in the chaos of life and enjoy that intimate experience whether I have my camera with me or not.

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